Inspiration: Sikh Wedding Attire

12183705_1173723389323685_4788078807848061018_o

A Sikh bride will wear a salwar kameez or lehenga to the wedding ceremony A bride always covers her head and shoulders with a draped dupatta while in the presence of the Guru Granth Sahib, in the temple or Gurudwara.

A long necklace with intricate ornamental design features part of jewellery, often made of gold. The elaborate design of the necklace is part of the extravagant attire worn by the bride. A pendant tikka (Sirbundi) is the most common head accessory for a Sikh bride, with the styles varying from elaborate to simple, depending on the bride’s preference.

A bride will also wear an ornate nose ring, gifted to the bride by her maternal uncle. The kaleere are two gold or silver plated, dome-shaped ornaments that dangle from the bride’s wrists, often attached to her bangles.

A Sikh groom either wears a churidar with kameez trousers or a Western suit. Many modern grooms opt to wear an elaborate Mughal-style sherwani or kurta instead. All Sikh grooms must have their heads covered by a turban for the religious part of the marriage ceremony. Covering their hair is a sign of utmost respect to God.

A sehra is a headdress with garlands that cover the face of the groom. The top of the ornament may be made with velvet or other extravagant material and be decorated with intricate embroidered designs. A Kripan as per his responsibility to protect his wife and family from harm in his new role as head of the household, the Sikh groom carries a sword on his wedding day. The sword is worn on a belt, to the side of his waist. Traditional Sikh attire requires a groom to have a beard.

12194577_1173723222657035_2845661321367923413_o11893910_1173723439323680_655846214806732987_o12182878_1173723369323687_81182074085354829_o12186816_1173723202657037_6836960867378168697_o12185329_1173723255990365_7550410241021907321_o11057231_1173723275990363_5425049034792281541_o

Featured Jewellery by Tanishq

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s